Civil Air Patrol

Heraldry of the Unit Patch

Unit patches often enable units to recognize significant things that are unique to that squadron.  While there are many designs with regards to unit patches, they usual follow certain guidelines.  The shapes will usually be circular, shield, or crest-like in shape.  Colors will be distinct to the unit, and usually not exceed 6 or so.

Tuskegee Cadet Squadron’s patch represents the squadron well.  Taking the basic shield shape, it’s background is white with two red stripes at the bottom, and three red stars above the stripes.  This represents the flag for the District of Columbia.  This also represents the family crest of President George Washington.  The triangular prop of Civil Air Patrol is present, paying respect to our organization.  And finally, the silver colored crimsoned tailed P-51C.  The P-51C was the last fighter used by the 332nd Fighter Group during WWII.  Members of the 332nd(as well as the 99th Pursuit Squadron and 477th Bombardment Group), were known as the Tuskegee Airmen; African Americans who trained for service in the segregated US Army Air Corps at Tuskegee Army Airfield.  Allies called these Airmen “Red Tails” or “Red-Tail Angels”, because of their distinct paint scheme on unit aircraft and superior efforts in escorting Allied long range bombers into enemy territory.  Finally, “Tuskegee Squadron” is centered and scrolled along the bottom of our unit patch.  Red and white are the predominant colors of our patch and factor greatly as to where we are, and where we derive our namesake.

These are all things, in the history of our nation, we should be very proud to be connected to.

Tuskegee Patch

 

** WE AREN’T ABLE TO SEND PATCHES TO OTHER SQUADRONS OR COLLECTORS**

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